School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up (2024)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined school-age children’s actual motor competence (MC) and perceived physical competence (PC) over 3 yr along with the covariate effects of gender and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Participants were 1121 (girls 573, boys 548) children (mean age, 11.26 ± 0.32 yr) from 35 randomly selected public schools across Finland. MC was assessed using three movement tests targeting locomotor, stability, and object control skills, and PC was assessed using the sport competence subscale of the Physical Self-Perception Profile via four-phase monitoring. Results: MC and PC remained stable over time. Of the three variables, locomotor skills showed the strongest association with PC. Lower BMIwas associated with advancedMC skills and a less steep decrease in locomotor and stability skills over time. Conclusions: The acquisition of fundamental motor skills in childhood and early adolescence is a prerequisite for enhancing MC and PC. The contribution of locomotor skills to PC indicated that versatile lower limb strength, speed, dynamic balance, and movement skills are important for positive subjective beliefs about PC capability. Increasing the MC skills of the children in most need, particularly those with high BMI scores, merits special attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1020-1027
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ADOLESCENCE
  • CHILDHOOD
  • LATENT GROWTH MODEL
  • LOCOMOTOR
  • OBJECT CONTROL
  • STABILITY

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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Gråstén, A., Huhtiniemi, M., & Jaakkola, T. (2022). School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 54(6), 1020-1027. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002870

School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up. / Gråstén, Arto; Huhtiniemi, Mikko; Jaakkola, Timo.
In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 54, No. 6, 01.06.2022, p. 1020-1027.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Gråstén, A, Huhtiniemi, M & Jaakkola, T 2022, 'School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 1020-1027. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002870

Gråstén A, Huhtiniemi M, Jaakkola T. School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2022 Jun 1;54(6):1020-1027. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002870

Gråstén, Arto ; Huhtiniemi, Mikko ; Jaakkola, Timo. / School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence : A 3-Yr Follow-up. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2022 ; Vol. 54, No. 6. pp. 1020-1027.

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AB - Purpose: This study examined school-age children’s actual motor competence (MC) and perceived physical competence (PC) over 3 yr along with the covariate effects of gender and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Participants were 1121 (girls 573, boys 548) children (mean age, 11.26 ± 0.32 yr) from 35 randomly selected public schools across Finland. MC was assessed using three movement tests targeting locomotor, stability, and object control skills, and PC was assessed using the sport competence subscale of the Physical Self-Perception Profile via four-phase monitoring. Results: MC and PC remained stable over time. Of the three variables, locomotor skills showed the strongest association with PC. Lower BMIwas associated with advancedMC skills and a less steep decrease in locomotor and stability skills over time. Conclusions: The acquisition of fundamental motor skills in childhood and early adolescence is a prerequisite for enhancing MC and PC. The contribution of locomotor skills to PC indicated that versatile lower limb strength, speed, dynamic balance, and movement skills are important for positive subjective beliefs about PC capability. Increasing the MC skills of the children in most need, particularly those with high BMI scores, merits special attention.

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School-Age Children’s Actual Motor Competence and Perceived Physical Competence: A 3-Yr Follow-up (2024)
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